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Hemifacial Spasm
Nicholas A. Koontz, MD
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DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

    ESSENTIAL INFORMATION

    • Key Differential Diagnosis Issues

      • Helpful Clues for Common Diagnoses

        • Helpful Clues for Less Common Diagnoses

          • Helpful Clues for Rare Diagnoses

            • Alternative Differential Approaches

              Selected References

              1. Donahue JH et al: Imaging of vascular compression syndromes. Radiol Clin North Am. 55(1):123-138, 2017
              2. Deep NL et al: Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of vascular contact of the facial nerve in the asymptomatic patient. J Neurol Surg B Skull Base. 77(6):503-509, 2016
              3. Haller S et al: Imaging of neurovascular compression syndromes: trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm, vestibular paroxysmia, and glossopharyngeal neuralgia. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 37(8):1384-92, 2016
              4. Öcal R et al: Comparison of brain MRI angiography and brain MRI cisternography in patients with hemifacial spasm. Acta Neurol Belg. 116(4):593-598, 2016
              5. Ray DK et al: Surgical outcome and improvement in quality of life after microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasms: a case series assessment using a validated disease-specific scale. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. 88(6):383-9, 2010
              6. Pyen JS et al: Tic convulsif caused by cerebellopontine angle schwannoma. Yonsei Med J. 2001 Apr;42(2):255-7. Retraction in: Yonsei Med J. 49(6):1060, 2008
              7. Desai K et al: Cerebellopontine angle epidermoid tumor presenting with hemifacial spasms. Neurol India. 51(2):288-9, 2003
              8. Iwai Y et al: Hemifacial spasm due to cerebellopontine angle meningiomas--two case reports. Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo). 41(2):87-9, 2001
              9. Takano S et al: Facial spasm and paroxysmal tinnitus associated with an arachnoid cyst of the cerebellopontine angle--case report. Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo). 38(2):100-3, 1998
              10. Illingworth RD et al: Hemifacial spasm: a prospective long-term follow up of 83 cases treated by microvascular decompression at two neurosurgical centres in the United Kingdom. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 60(1):72-7, 1996
              11. Moriuchi S et al: Hemifacial spasm due to compression of the facial nerve by vertebral artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm and elongated vertebral artery--case report. Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo). 36(12):884-7, 1996
              12. Nagata S et al: Hemifacial spasm caused by CP angle AVM associated with ruptured aneurysm in the feeding artery--case report. Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo). 31(7):406-9, 1991
              Related Anatomy
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              Related Differential Diagnoses
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              References
              Tables

              Tables

              DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

                ESSENTIAL INFORMATION

                • Key Differential Diagnosis Issues

                  • Helpful Clues for Common Diagnoses

                    • Helpful Clues for Less Common Diagnoses

                      • Helpful Clues for Rare Diagnoses

                        • Alternative Differential Approaches

                          Selected References

                          1. Donahue JH et al: Imaging of vascular compression syndromes. Radiol Clin North Am. 55(1):123-138, 2017
                          2. Deep NL et al: Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of vascular contact of the facial nerve in the asymptomatic patient. J Neurol Surg B Skull Base. 77(6):503-509, 2016
                          3. Haller S et al: Imaging of neurovascular compression syndromes: trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm, vestibular paroxysmia, and glossopharyngeal neuralgia. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 37(8):1384-92, 2016
                          4. Öcal R et al: Comparison of brain MRI angiography and brain MRI cisternography in patients with hemifacial spasm. Acta Neurol Belg. 116(4):593-598, 2016
                          5. Ray DK et al: Surgical outcome and improvement in quality of life after microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasms: a case series assessment using a validated disease-specific scale. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. 88(6):383-9, 2010
                          6. Pyen JS et al: Tic convulsif caused by cerebellopontine angle schwannoma. Yonsei Med J. 2001 Apr;42(2):255-7. Retraction in: Yonsei Med J. 49(6):1060, 2008
                          7. Desai K et al: Cerebellopontine angle epidermoid tumor presenting with hemifacial spasms. Neurol India. 51(2):288-9, 2003
                          8. Iwai Y et al: Hemifacial spasm due to cerebellopontine angle meningiomas--two case reports. Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo). 41(2):87-9, 2001
                          9. Takano S et al: Facial spasm and paroxysmal tinnitus associated with an arachnoid cyst of the cerebellopontine angle--case report. Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo). 38(2):100-3, 1998
                          10. Illingworth RD et al: Hemifacial spasm: a prospective long-term follow up of 83 cases treated by microvascular decompression at two neurosurgical centres in the United Kingdom. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 60(1):72-7, 1996
                          11. Moriuchi S et al: Hemifacial spasm due to compression of the facial nerve by vertebral artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm and elongated vertebral artery--case report. Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo). 36(12):884-7, 1996
                          12. Nagata S et al: Hemifacial spasm caused by CP angle AVM associated with ruptured aneurysm in the feeding artery--case report. Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo). 31(7):406-9, 1991