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Overview of the Anterior Compartment
Rania Farouk El Sayed, MD, PhD
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Terminology

  • Abbreviations

    • Pubourethral ligament (PUL)
      • Proximal pubourethral ligament (PPUL)
      • Intermediate pubourethral ligament (IPUL)
      • Distal pubourethral ligament (DPUL)
    • Suburethral ligament (SBUL)
    • External urethral sphincter (EUS)
    • Compressor urethrae (CU)
    • Urethrovaginal sphincter (UVS)
  • Definitions

    • Components of anterior compartment include urinary bladder, urethra, and urethral support system

Urinary Bladder

  • Location and Description

    • Bladder Support

      Female Urethra

      • Location and Description

        • Functional Correlation of Urethral Wall

          • Topographic Anatomy of Female Urethra

            • Innervation

              Urethral Support System

              • Components

                • Urethral Ligaments

                  • Endopelvic Fascia

                    • Puborectalis Muscle

                      Urinary Incontinence (UI)

                      • General Issues

                        • Terminology and Classification

                          • Etiology

                            • Urethral Support System Dysfunction

                              • Sphincteric Mechanism Dysfunction

                                Selected References

                                1. American Urogynecologic Society and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: Committee opinion: evaluation of uncomplicated stress urinary incontinence in women before surgical treatment. Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg. 20(5):248-51, 2014
                                2. Bitti GT et al: Pelvic floor failure: MR imaging evaluation of anatomic and functional abnormalities. Radiographics. 34(2):429-48, 2014
                                3. Del Vescovo R et al: MRI role in morphological and functional assessment of the levator ani muscle: use in patients affected by stress urinary incontinence (SUI) before and after pelvic floor rehabilitation. Eur J Radiol. 83(3):479-86, 2014
                                4. Farouk El Sayed R: The urogynecological side of pelvic floor MRI: the clinician's needs and the radiologist's role. Abdom Imaging. 38(5):912-29, 2013
                                5. Lammers K et al: Correlating signs and symptoms with pubovisceral muscle avulsions on magnetic resonance imaging. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 208(2):148, 2013
                                6. Surabhi VR et al: Magnetic resonance imaging of female urethral and periurethral disorders. Radiol Clin North Am. 51(6):941-53, 2013
                                7. Tasali N et al: MRI in stress urinary incontinence: endovaginal MRI with an intracavitary coil and dynamic pelvic MRI. Urol J. 9(1):397-404, 2012
                                8. Maglinte DD et al: Functional imaging of the pelvic floor. Radiology. 258(1):23-39, 2011
                                9. Haylen BT et al: An International Urogynecological Association (IUGA)/International Continence Society (ICS) joint report on the terminology for female pelvic floor dysfunction. Int Urogynecol J. 21(1):5-26, 2010
                                10. Miller JM et al: MRI findings in patients considered high risk for pelvic floor injury studied serially after vaginal childbirth. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 195(3):786-91, 2010
                                11. Bennett GL et al: MRI of the urethra in women with lower urinary tract symptoms: spectrum of findings at static and dynamic imaging. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 193(6):1708-15, 2009
                                12. El Sayed RF et al: Pelvic floor dysfunction: assessment with combined analysis of static and dynamic MR imaging findings. Radiology. 248(2):518-30, 2008
                                13. El Sayed RF et al: Anatomy of the urethral supporting ligaments defined by dissection, histology, and MRI of female cadavers and MRI of healthy nulliparous women. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 189(5):1145-57, 2007
                                14. Macura KJ et al: MR imaging of the female urethra and supporting ligaments in assessment of urinary incontinence: spectrum of abnormalities. Radiographics. 26(4):1135-49, 2006
                                15. Kim JK et al: The urethra and its supporting structures in women with stress urinary incontinence: MR imaging using an endovaginal coil. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 180(4):1037-44, 2003
                                16. Minassian VA et al: Urinary incontinence as a worldwide problem. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 82(3):327-38, 2003
                                17. Stoker J et al: High-resolution endovaginal MR imaging in stress urinary incontinence. Eur Radiol. 13(8):2031-7, 2003
                                18. DeLancey JO: Structural support of the urethra as it relates to stress urinary incontinence: the hammock hypothesis. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 170(6):1713-20; discussion 1720-3, 1994
                                Related Anatomy
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                                Related Differential Diagnoses
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                                References
                                Tables

                                Tables

                                Terminology

                                • Abbreviations

                                  • Pubourethral ligament (PUL)
                                    • Proximal pubourethral ligament (PPUL)
                                    • Intermediate pubourethral ligament (IPUL)
                                    • Distal pubourethral ligament (DPUL)
                                  • Suburethral ligament (SBUL)
                                  • External urethral sphincter (EUS)
                                  • Compressor urethrae (CU)
                                  • Urethrovaginal sphincter (UVS)
                                • Definitions

                                  • Components of anterior compartment include urinary bladder, urethra, and urethral support system

                                Urinary Bladder

                                • Location and Description

                                  • Bladder Support

                                    Female Urethra

                                    • Location and Description

                                      • Functional Correlation of Urethral Wall

                                        • Topographic Anatomy of Female Urethra

                                          • Innervation

                                            Urethral Support System

                                            • Components

                                              • Urethral Ligaments

                                                • Endopelvic Fascia

                                                  • Puborectalis Muscle

                                                    Urinary Incontinence (UI)

                                                    • General Issues

                                                      • Terminology and Classification

                                                        • Etiology

                                                          • Urethral Support System Dysfunction

                                                            • Sphincteric Mechanism Dysfunction

                                                              Selected References

                                                              1. American Urogynecologic Society and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: Committee opinion: evaluation of uncomplicated stress urinary incontinence in women before surgical treatment. Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg. 20(5):248-51, 2014
                                                              2. Bitti GT et al: Pelvic floor failure: MR imaging evaluation of anatomic and functional abnormalities. Radiographics. 34(2):429-48, 2014
                                                              3. Del Vescovo R et al: MRI role in morphological and functional assessment of the levator ani muscle: use in patients affected by stress urinary incontinence (SUI) before and after pelvic floor rehabilitation. Eur J Radiol. 83(3):479-86, 2014
                                                              4. Farouk El Sayed R: The urogynecological side of pelvic floor MRI: the clinician's needs and the radiologist's role. Abdom Imaging. 38(5):912-29, 2013
                                                              5. Lammers K et al: Correlating signs and symptoms with pubovisceral muscle avulsions on magnetic resonance imaging. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 208(2):148, 2013
                                                              6. Surabhi VR et al: Magnetic resonance imaging of female urethral and periurethral disorders. Radiol Clin North Am. 51(6):941-53, 2013
                                                              7. Tasali N et al: MRI in stress urinary incontinence: endovaginal MRI with an intracavitary coil and dynamic pelvic MRI. Urol J. 9(1):397-404, 2012
                                                              8. Maglinte DD et al: Functional imaging of the pelvic floor. Radiology. 258(1):23-39, 2011
                                                              9. Haylen BT et al: An International Urogynecological Association (IUGA)/International Continence Society (ICS) joint report on the terminology for female pelvic floor dysfunction. Int Urogynecol J. 21(1):5-26, 2010
                                                              10. Miller JM et al: MRI findings in patients considered high risk for pelvic floor injury studied serially after vaginal childbirth. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 195(3):786-91, 2010
                                                              11. Bennett GL et al: MRI of the urethra in women with lower urinary tract symptoms: spectrum of findings at static and dynamic imaging. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 193(6):1708-15, 2009
                                                              12. El Sayed RF et al: Pelvic floor dysfunction: assessment with combined analysis of static and dynamic MR imaging findings. Radiology. 248(2):518-30, 2008
                                                              13. El Sayed RF et al: Anatomy of the urethral supporting ligaments defined by dissection, histology, and MRI of female cadavers and MRI of healthy nulliparous women. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 189(5):1145-57, 2007
                                                              14. Macura KJ et al: MR imaging of the female urethra and supporting ligaments in assessment of urinary incontinence: spectrum of abnormalities. Radiographics. 26(4):1135-49, 2006
                                                              15. Kim JK et al: The urethra and its supporting structures in women with stress urinary incontinence: MR imaging using an endovaginal coil. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 180(4):1037-44, 2003
                                                              16. Minassian VA et al: Urinary incontinence as a worldwide problem. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 82(3):327-38, 2003
                                                              17. Stoker J et al: High-resolution endovaginal MR imaging in stress urinary incontinence. Eur Radiol. 13(8):2031-7, 2003
                                                              18. DeLancey JO: Structural support of the urethra as it relates to stress urinary incontinence: the hammock hypothesis. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 170(6):1713-20; discussion 1720-3, 1994