link
Bookmarks
Syphilis
B.J. Manaster, MD, PhD, FACR
To access 4,300 diagnoses written by the world's leading experts in radiology, please log in or subscribe.Log inSubscribe
0
4
20
2

KEY FACTS

  • Imaging

    TERMINOLOGY

    • Definitions

      • Chronic systemic infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum
        • Acquired syphilis: Transmitted by direct contact with moist infectious lesions of skin and mucous membranes (usually sexual contact)
          • Primary lesion: Chancre at site of inoculation; appears 3-6 weeks following transmission
          • Secondary syphilis: Generalized skin eruption, occurring ~ 6 weeks following primary lesion
          • Tertiary syphilis: Large destructive lesions (gummas) form in any organ (especially in skin and bone), often after long latent period (10-30 years)
        • Congenital syphilis: Transmission to fetus through placenta

    IMAGING

    • General Features

      Selected References

      1. Naraghi AM et al: Magnetic resonance imaging features of osseous manifestations of early acquired syphilis. Skeletal Radiol. 39(3):305-9, 2010
      2. Viens NA et al: Case report: Neuropathic arthropathy of the hip as a sequela of undiagnosed tertiary syphilis. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 468(11):3126-31, 2010
      3. Armangil D et al: Early congenital syphilis with isolated bone involvement: a case report. Turk J Pediatr. 51(2):169-71, 2009
      4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Congenital syphilis--United States, 2002. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 53(31):716-9, 2004
      Related Anatomy
      Loading...
      Related Differential Diagnoses
      Loading...
      References
      Tables

      Tables

      KEY FACTS

      • Imaging

        TERMINOLOGY

        • Definitions

          • Chronic systemic infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum
            • Acquired syphilis: Transmitted by direct contact with moist infectious lesions of skin and mucous membranes (usually sexual contact)
              • Primary lesion: Chancre at site of inoculation; appears 3-6 weeks following transmission
              • Secondary syphilis: Generalized skin eruption, occurring ~ 6 weeks following primary lesion
              • Tertiary syphilis: Large destructive lesions (gummas) form in any organ (especially in skin and bone), often after long latent period (10-30 years)
            • Congenital syphilis: Transmission to fetus through placenta

        IMAGING

        • General Features

          Selected References

          1. Naraghi AM et al: Magnetic resonance imaging features of osseous manifestations of early acquired syphilis. Skeletal Radiol. 39(3):305-9, 2010
          2. Viens NA et al: Case report: Neuropathic arthropathy of the hip as a sequela of undiagnosed tertiary syphilis. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 468(11):3126-31, 2010
          3. Armangil D et al: Early congenital syphilis with isolated bone involvement: a case report. Turk J Pediatr. 51(2):169-71, 2009
          4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Congenital syphilis--United States, 2002. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 53(31):716-9, 2004